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JEWISH GHETTO TOUR: 2.5 Hour Tour                                                                      

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PRIVATE JEWISH GHETTO TOUR IN ROME

Let Well Arranged Travel take you on a private  Rome’s Jewish Ghetto tour

Jewish Tour in Rome Includes:  Our Jewish ghetto tour in Rome includes entrance tickets to Synagogue and services of a licensed Rome tour guide.

rome_jewishghetto1 - Jewish Ghetto Tour

Their private Jewish ghetto tour in Rome will take you to a charming neighborhood off the only island over the Tiber: not your stereotypical “ghetto.” In this Jewish ghetto tour, you will visit the modern-inspired, metal-domed Synagogue, twisty side streets facing the only ancient Roman theatre still visible in the area, and the nearby ancient fish market with its marble stalls.

From the island, you will walk over to Trastevere, a perfect place for dining out spot or an evening stroll. This is the zone off the Trastevere bank, mere steps away from the island, which you can reach by walking over an ancient Roman bridge.

Some historical facts…

Pope Paul IV issued a legislation that revoked all the rights of the Jewish community and imposed religious and economic restrictions on Roman Jews on July 14, 1555.  This includes restrictions on their personal freedom. The legislation established the creation of the walled  and gated ghetto where the Jewish community were forced to move.  At the time there were about 2,000 Jews who were locked in at night.  They imposed Jewish males to wear pointed yellow hats and Jewish females a yellow badge. They were restricted to only have 1 synagogue and were forced to attend Catholic sermons on Jewish Shabbat.

The Roman Jews could only hold unskilled jobs as fish mongers, pawnbrokers or secondhand dealers.  They were forbidden to own properties and to practice medicine on Christians.

Pope Paul IV’s 2 successors continued the expansion to create other ghettos in most Italian towns and other bordering states. The oppression was finally abolished in 1882.

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